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  #14801  
Old 05-21-2020, 07:39 PM
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Oh, yeah. I didn't like that one. Nor Ready Player One.
RP1 wasn't that good as a book, but it's one of the most fun reads I've had because I loved (and lived through) much of the 80s stuff in it.
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Old 05-21-2020, 07:48 PM
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It takes a book or two to get good. Audio narrator is fantastic, Marsters or something -- actor from buffy series.
ok, I'll have to look to see if hoopla has it. I think I looked before, and they had a few of the books as e-books but not audiobooks.
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Old 05-21-2020, 08:28 PM
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ok, I'll have to look to see if hoopla has it. I think I looked before, and they had a few of the books as e-books but not audiobooks.
You live in Westchester, right? Westchester's public library has excellent selection on overdrive/Libby for audiobooks. Plus all NYS residents can get Brooklyn and nypl cards for free. Whenever Nassau, doesn't have a book I look at nypl. Of nyol doesn't have it Brooklyn probably does. If none of them have it, then Suffolk or Westchester most likely have it. Fortunately I have a co-worker from Suffolk who blet me use her Suffolk card. So I'm mostly good.
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Old 05-21-2020, 09:22 PM
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Okay, from this list, which ones would y'all recommend?
@mpc: Steven Erikson's series but it's dense, you can't skim-read



After that, or maybe before that, I'll second the recommendation of the Mistborn trilogy.

And not on that list but another worthy mention is Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy.

@Patience: The Martian is a super fun book!

@errbody: And Dark Matter is probably must-read before all of that--my apologies for not knowing if it made waves in this thread when it was released.
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Old 05-21-2020, 10:39 PM
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Mansfield Park can be a difficult book to get into. Fanny is a very passive heroine, and moral dilemmas are central to the plot, which produce more angst than excitement. I did not care much for it when I first read it in my 20s. But over time, it grew on me, and I actually appreciate Fanny a lot more now. She is able to stick to her guns without miraculously transforming from an introvert to a spitfire.
I had a very similar reaction upon rereading Mansfield Park recently. I did enjoy it the first time round but liked it much more this time. Fanny isn't one of Jane Austen's sparkling, witty heroines like Elizabeth Bennet or Emma Woodhouse - she's much closer to Anne Elliot, who is also constrained by circumstances.

I also read Lady Susan for the first time recently. That was laugh out loud funny and quite a surprise to me. Lady Susan is utterly amoral but JA has you admiring her despite yourself, because she is charming, clever and funny. The person who really does all the right things and should be the heroine is quite insipid. Quite an inversion of expectations!
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Old 05-22-2020, 07:21 AM
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I read a collection of Austen's juvenalia recently, and some of it is quite silly [on purpose]

She did really broad humor early on, and did end up polishing it
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:40 AM
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Fantasy because it's really just LOTR over and over again.
This really hasn't been true since the 1980s.
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:49 AM
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My favorite fantasy is Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. Note the first 30 pages are very slow for no reason... after that it's just such a good long wonderful story that never lets you down.
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really weird coincidence, that is the title I just semi-randomly pulled to do a google search to find the lists origin
FYI, Clarke has another book that came out in 2006 ("The Ladies of Grace Adieu and Other Stories") that is supposed to be somewhat similar in tone (I bought it, and it's in my near-term TBR). She also has a new novel coming out in September of this year (Piranesi) that I've preordered.
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  #14809  
Old 05-22-2020, 10:00 AM
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Gonna delete the ones I've read to get a list for me

Okay, from this list, which ones would y'all recommend?

[also, if you recommend a series, please let me know if it's complete or not. I don't want to read unfinished series right now]
Let me see:

18. The Kingkiller Chronicles, by Patrick Rothfuss - Not complete, and likely never will be (I've seen no sign he's made any progress on book 3 since 2012). First two books were excellent, though.

30. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess - I haven't read this in nearly 20 years, but I remember I liked it then (I saw the movie first).

46. The Silmarillion, by J.R.R. Tolkien - If fantasy were told by a historian/translated religious book? I haven't read this in 24 years but I intend to get through it again.

64. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, by Susanna Clarke - This is not a fast paced novel, but I remember enjoying it (there's also a miniseries on Amazon Prime I believe).

66. The Riftwar Saga, by Raymond E. Feist - I've never read any of the books, but I liked the story from affiliated video games.

68. The Conan The Barbarian Series, by R.E. Howard - classic pulp fantasy

69. The Farseer Trilogy, by Robin Hobb - I really enjoyed the original trilogy when I read it 15 or so years ago. The full series is complete, but 16 books long. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_...the_Elderlings

73. The Legend Of Drizzt Series, by R.A. Salvatore - This is pulp fantasy, and something I often read as a break from heavier reads. There are now 42 books that are either Drizzt or directly related (the Cleric Quintet has a character that is in some of the Drizzt books). There are some books in the 42 I have no intention of reading ("The Stone of Tymora" trilogy, which he wrote with his son, is intended for younger readers). On my reread (started last fall), I'm 13 books in, + the 5 Cleric Quintet books, and 21 more that I may read eventually (6 that are on my near-term TBR). This is Dungeons & Dragons, so a lot of the story background is dictated by the environment and what plot changes occurred in the Forgotten Realms universe.

77. The Kushiel's Legacy Series, by Jacqueline Carey - this has come recommended from some people I follow; I pre-ordered the re-release of book 1.

81. The Malazan Book Of The Fallen Series, by Steven Erikson - I loved this series, but it's slow going (it took me 14 months to read the 10 books). He and his co-creator have kept the series going, but the 10 book series is complete.

98. Perdido Street Station, by China Mieville - I've heard many many recommendations for this. I think along with One Hundred Years of Solitude, this will be on my next buying list.
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  #14810  
Old 05-22-2020, 10:03 AM
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A book I need to reread is Gulliver's Travels. By far my favorite fantasy work.
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