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  #11  
Old 04-17-2014, 08:56 AM
jas66Kent jas66Kent is offline
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You haven't really expanded on what kind of work experience you actually have (Planning a future internship doesn't really cut it as that isn't written in stone), so if you could give us a better picture of that, it would help.

From what I've seen, there are very few people that do a BSc in AS in the UK, and then follow it up with the MSc in AS without incurring some kind of work experience in between.

For the MSc, you will have to choose a track. Either Life, Pensions, Finance, GI, or ERM. (You can usually only choose either 2 or 3 ST's during your MSc)
With no work experience, this could prove to be a problematic decision. The last thing you want is to go into an MSc, choose ST's, then go into the industry, and then subsequently find out that you don't like the work.

Having said that, would you be in a better position than somebody that had not done the MSc after their BSc, and had simply gone into work?

That's a tough question. If you've cleared the CT's via exemptions, but have no real relevant work experience (like an internship), I would say no (Company's want some kind of evidence that you can do the work in industry and University exemptions don't really cut it). But if you do have an internship (or some other kind of relevant work experience) I would say yes. (I say yes here because the MSc is only one year, so you're not losing that much time relative to the other person that simply chose to work after their BSc)

Having said all that...if you do indeed land an internship during your BSc, I would most definitely do the MSc. It's a quick and easy way to get the upper level exams out of the way. Far, far easier than writing the IoFA exams while working.

Last edited by jas66Kent; 04-17-2014 at 09:02 AM..
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  #12  
Old 04-17-2014, 10:44 AM
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GargoyleWaiting GargoyleWaiting is offline
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Not sure I agree with everything Jas says, but I'd definitely echo the "get some work experience" part.

Find some work, do it, and find out if you enjoy it. Your employer would also be able to give a much better steer on whether the MSc is worth it. I would imagine the worth of the MSc will vary depending on the track you choose to go down - I think Jas works in a sector which prizes academic qualifications more highly than mine, so it may be more valuable to him than it would be to me.
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Old 04-17-2014, 02:50 PM
tude tude is offline
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Why don't we have the exam exemptions in the US like they do in the UK?
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  #14  
Old 04-18-2014, 04:28 AM
jas66Kent jas66Kent is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tude View Post
Why don't we have the exam exemptions in the US like they do in the UK?
Don't open that can of worms.......

It'll bring out the anti-FEM people in full force.
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Old 04-18-2014, 04:42 PM
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ubernerd ubernerd is offline
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Quote:
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Why don't we have the exam exemptions in the US like they do in the UK?
That would only make sense if the purpose of CAS and SOA exams was to educate. It is not. The CAS and SOA are guilds and like all guilds their only purpose is to increase the income of their current members by 1) limiting the number of practitioners and 2) expanding the scope of practice.

Having you memorize lots of mind-numbing trivia and then regurgitate it on paper is a time-honored way of accomplishing 1). Jas66Kent is absolutely correct in saying that proposing any kind of exam exemption opens a can of worms.
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Last edited by ubernerd; 04-18-2014 at 04:43 PM.. Reason: forgot something
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