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  #6311  
Old 04-22-2020, 12:43 PM
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For jobs where WFH is viable, WFH ideally should continue for at least 6 months. But the businesses who weren't already doing WFH on a large scale before the pandemic will be quick to bring back people to the office too soon. Many will start reversing the WFH arrangements in 2 or 3 weeks.
we weren't doing WFH on a large scale before the pandemic hit, but I don't see us rushing to get back to the office. we would like to not die. no way we are going back in 2 or 3 weeks. the pause order was extended to mid-may and i suspect it will be extended beyond that.
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  #6312  
Old 04-22-2020, 12:47 PM
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For jobs where WFH is viable, WFH ideally should continue for at least 6 months. But the businesses who weren't already doing WFH on a large scale before the pandemic will be quick to bring back people to the office too soon. Many will start reversing the WFH arrangements in 2 or 3 weeks.
I can't see that happening any time soon in NYC. Too many people commute to the office via subway, and no employer wants to risk an easily preventable major outbreak at the office. We've been working from home without any real issues for a month and a half now. I can easily see this becoming the new normal. Office workers will be among the last people going back to the typical routine, and honestly, six months of working from home seems optimistic at this point.

The idea that you would commute an hour each way to sit at a desk eight hours a day for an office job has been outdated for at least a decade now. That old arrangement persisted due to momentum, but now that the momentum has stopped, even if temporarily, the situation on the other side of this will be very different. The longer this lasts, the less recognizable the future will be. Events like this tend to produce all sorts of second and third order effects that we can barely even begin to imagine today, which raises a million interesting questions on what the future of office work will look like.
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  #6313  
Old 04-22-2020, 01:10 PM
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I think he was awkwardly asking how to create a new thread and picked a random thread to do that in.
i thought of that too but was too lazy to type the extra sentence required to explain it. plus, didn't want to confuse just in case.
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  #6314  
Old 04-22-2020, 01:17 PM
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I can't see that happening any time soon in NYC. Too many people commute to the office via subway, and no employer wants to risk an easily preventable major outbreak at the office. We've been working from home without any real issues for a month and a half now. I can easily see this becoming the new normal. Office workers will be among the last people going back to the typical routine, and honestly, six months of working from home seems optimistic at this point.
Agree, but this is going to be highly regionalized. Here in central TX, we have relatively few cases and no real mass transit system so offices will likely open sooner. Also agree that in the long run, this will change a lot of perspectives about WFH and those that believed people would not be as productive in a WFH environment will hopefully be shown that is not the case.
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  #6315  
Old 04-22-2020, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by nonactuarialactuary View Post
I can't see that happening any time soon in NYC. Too many people commute to the office via subway, and no employer wants to risk an easily preventable major outbreak at the office. We've been working from home without any real issues for a month and a half now. I can easily see this becoming the new normal. Office workers will be among the last people going back to the typical routine, and honestly, six months of working from home seems optimistic at this point.

The idea that you would commute an hour each way to sit at a desk eight hours a day for an office job has been outdated for at least a decade now. That old arrangement persisted due to momentum, but now that the momentum has stopped, even if temporarily, the situation on the other side of this will be very different. The longer this lasts, the less recognizable the future will be. Events like this tend to produce all sorts of second and third order effects that we can barely even begin to imagine today, which raises a million interesting questions on what the future of office work will look like.
Are there any investment funds focused on companies with high levels of WFH? I'm curious to see what the difference in performance will be between companies based on their previous WFH capabilities.
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  #6316  
Old 04-22-2020, 01:27 PM
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Turns out the last positive case in my province was a false positive and so we're now sitting at 5 days straight of zero new cases.
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  #6317  
Old 04-22-2020, 01:36 PM
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Turns out the last positive case in my province was a false positive and so we're now sitting at 5 days straight of zero new cases.
482 (+15% growth) new cases in my state yesterday and our useless Governor keeps praising her response...
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  #6318  
Old 04-22-2020, 01:36 PM
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I can't see that happening any time soon in NYC. Too many people commute to the office via subway, and no employer wants to risk an easily preventable major outbreak at the office. We've been working from home without any real issues for a month and a half now. I can easily see this becoming the new normal. Office workers will be among the last people going back to the typical routine, and honestly, six months of working from home seems optimistic at this point.
WFH probably will persist longer in NYC than almost anywhere else. But where I work, they're talking about bringing back people to the office starting next month in a staggered approach. Maybe the legal team or HR will convince them that it's too much of a liability risk to bring people back anytime soon, or maybe not.
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Old 04-22-2020, 01:56 PM
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just thinking about how i think i caught a cold in January from a coworker. I assume that COVID-19 is spread in a similar way. fairly certain I caught a cold from the admin who typed a report for me. she had a cold at the time and I got a crappy cold like 3 days later. so it wasn't even from the air. it was from touching the same stuff. i'm not sure how to totally avoid that in an office.
Maybe you caught COVID-19 from her.
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  #6320  
Old 04-22-2020, 02:03 PM
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For jobs where WFH is viable, WFH ideally should continue for at least 6 months. But the businesses who weren't already doing WFH on a large scale before the pandemic will be quick to bring back people to the office too soon. Many will start reversing the WFH arrangements in 2 or 3 weeks.
Maybe. My employer did some WFH prior to this, but it wasn't a permanent thing for most people. They emphasized being present in the office for most of the leadership and strategic roles. Maybe 75% of employees had the capability to connect from home if needed, but it wasn't really "how we do things". Now they've invested in making sure that all but like 2% of people (mostly some critical IT and security roles) can WFH indefinitely. I'm sure that some of the operational people will be back in the office sooner, but we've already had discussions about keeping as many people at home after the shut down is lifted as we can. We've got a few people who are really itching to get out of their house and back to the office, but I think most of us think it would be wiser to continue WFH for another 6 months or so.
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