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  #11  
Old 12-19-2019, 01:59 PM
sticks1839 sticks1839 is offline
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Originally Posted by Vorian Atreides View Post
Also, any resources that describes some of the other "modeling" libraries?

More specifically, are there any that contain procedures/functions/etc. covering any actuarial type material? For example, there is a ChainLadder package in R that does some of the modeling stuff found on CAS Exams 5 and 7. Anything similar to be found for Python?
Statsmodels is a good package for working with distributions. You can easily do random pulls from a distribution for simulation or bootstrap. Nothing purpose built for actuarial though. If you search hard enough, you can find someone who started trying to port ChainLadder over to Python, but it was never stable or useful for me.

I know this is Python specific, but if you plan to work on more "actuarial" stuff like triangles and reserving, I'd recommend sticking with R. From what I can tell, R is much more popular in the academia/actuarial worlds. I use Python scripting to replace a lot of VBA macros for data extraction, manipulation and some analysis/visualization work; but still prefer Excel for reserve workpapers to make selections and make the data more tangible.
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:30 PM
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Statsmodels is a good package for working with distributions. You can easily do random pulls from a distribution for simulation or bootstrap. Nothing purpose built for actuarial though. If you search hard enough, you can find someone who started trying to port ChainLadder over to Python, but it was never stable or useful for me.

I know this is Python specific, but if you plan to work on more "actuarial" stuff like triangles and reserving, I'd recommend sticking with R. From what I can tell, R is much more popular in the academia/actuarial worlds. I use Python scripting to replace a lot of VBA macros for data extraction, manipulation and some analysis/visualization work; but still prefer Excel for reserve workpapers to make selections and make the data more tangible.
Thanks for the information and insights. Part of my task is to evaluate how feasible doing some of the underlying actuarial work would be in Python.

But thanks for the suggestion about Statsmodels. I'll be sure to include that in my work and evaluations.
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Old 12-19-2019, 10:54 PM
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You don't really have to search that hard.

chainladder for Python
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Old 12-20-2019, 09:54 AM
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You don't really have to search that hard.

chainladder for Python
Awesome. Thanks!
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Old 12-20-2019, 10:06 AM
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np
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Old 12-20-2019, 11:51 AM
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  #17  
Old 12-22-2019, 11:18 PM
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Sticks, thanks for the information. I am starting a course in January that includes some R programming, so I am thinking about trying to get a head start with a free online course.
Are there any specific courses that anyone would recommend? Thanks in advance.

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Originally Posted by sticks1839 View Post
Statsmodels is a good package for working with distributions. You can easily do random pulls from a distribution for simulation or bootstrap. Nothing purpose built for actuarial though. If you search hard enough, you can find someone who started trying to port ChainLadder over to Python, but it was never stable or useful for me.

I know this is Python specific, but if you plan to work on more "actuarial" stuff like triangles and reserving, I'd recommend sticking with R. From what I can tell, R is much more popular in the academia/actuarial worlds. I use Python scripting to replace a lot of VBA macros for data extraction, manipulation and some analysis/visualization work; but still prefer Excel for reserve workpapers to make selections and make the data more tangible.
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  #18  
Old 12-23-2019, 09:57 AM
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IMO the leading educator in Python for anything data-related is Ted Petrou through Dunder Data. I have the All Access pass. Well worth the money. (I have no affiliation with Ted or with Dunder Data - I'm just a very happy customer.)

In switching from R to Python, the main thing I'm missing is the RStudio IDE. I'm not a fan of Jupyter Notebooks. The .py code export often has extraneous stuff in it, and I'm not a fan of the fact that the Jupyter Notebook IDE forces me to think in chunks that usually don't make sense.
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Old 12-23-2019, 10:20 AM
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why notebooks suck:
https://docs.google.com/presentation...XP-AL4ffI/edit

https://twitter.com/joelgrus/status/...378113?lang=en
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  #20  
Old 12-23-2019, 11:32 AM
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I wonder if there would be a market of sorts for an IDE optimized for actuarial work. Looking at triangles and other common actuarial data types through a terminal or through notebook output isn't very intuitive for an actuary, but if you go 100% GUI based then you lose the power and reproducibility of code.

I'm also not a fan of notebooks. They are kind of hard to version control and it's really easy to accidentally commit things you shouldn't. Maybe it's because I'm bad at using notebooks, or maybe it's because the notebooks are bad.
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