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  #41  
Old 12-26-2019, 12:34 PM
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tl;dr:How do I change a linked table to link to a different table...the new table is in the same directory as the old linked table just with a different name...and the name of it within Access will stay the same?

edit: I think what I need to do, for the version of Office I have, is link the new table in under a different table name, delete the old one, rename the new one to the name of the old one all while making sure the "Data Type"s are correct.

---
It looks like I'm using Office Professional 2019.

I'm trying to use Linked Table Manager to change the linked tables.

I followed these steps:
Quote:
To change the path for a set of linked tables:

1) Open the database that contains links to tables.
2) On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, and then click Linked Table Manager.
3) Select the Always prompt for new location check box.
4) Select the check box for the tables whose links you want to change, and then click OK.
5) In the Select New Location of <table name> dialog box, specify the new location, click Open, and then click OK.
The current linked file is in C:\ewelater\Inforce20190930.csv

The new linked file is in C:\ewelater\Inforce20191130.csv

I go through those steps above, I get a popup telling me that "All selected linked tables were successfully refreshed.", but then I look at the LTM and they are still all the old files.

It seems that those instructions are for only updating the location of a file but not the filename.

Last edited by 1695814; 12-26-2019 at 03:06 PM..
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  #42  
Old 12-31-2019, 03:10 PM
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I have a really long expression in the "Field". It's difficult to read it. I recall there's a way to edit that in a different manner such that you can more easily see all of the text. How is that done?


edit: right-click, Build

Last edited by 1695814; 12-31-2019 at 03:18 PM..
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  #43  
Old 12-31-2019, 04:59 PM
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I'm looking at someone else's code. They're extracting the issue year from an issue date.

The formula is IssueYear: CDbl(Left([ISSUE_DATE],4))

I can't figure out what the purpose of CDbl is. It seems to be some sort of initialization of the type of variable that IssueYear s/b but why it needs to be "CDbl" I don't quite understand.
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  #44  
Old 12-31-2019, 07:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1695814 View Post
I'm looking at someone else's code. They're extracting the issue year from an issue date.

The formula is IssueYear: CDbl(Left([ISSUE_DATE],4))

I can't figure out what the purpose of CDbl is. It seems to be some sort of initialization of the type of variable that IssueYear s/b but why it needs to be "CDbl" I don't quite understand.
The most likely explanation:
  • ISSUE_DATE is a string
  • Someone wants IssueYear to be numeric

As to why "someone" wants year to be Double as opposed to an Integer... that would depend on the application, I suppose.

EDIT: The first bullet point could also be: "'Someone' isn't sure what format ISSUE_DATE will be" since CDbl is a function that essentially says "take this and interpret it as a double-type number if you can"....but I've never tried using Left() on anything that wasn't a string, so....

Last edited by Maphisto's Sidekick; 12-31-2019 at 07:13 PM..
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  #45  
Old 01-01-2020, 05:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maphisto's Sidekick View Post
The most likely explanation:
  • ISSUE_DATE is a string
  • Someone wants IssueYear to be numeric

As to why "someone" wants year to be Double as opposed to an Integer... that would depend on the application, I suppose.

EDIT: The first bullet point could also be: "'Someone' isn't sure what format ISSUE_DATE will be" since CDbl is a function that essentially says "take this and interpret it as a double-type number if you can"....but I've never tried using Left() on anything that wasn't a string, so....
Everything you said makes sense to me except could you explain what a "double-type number" is?


Thanks.
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  #46  
Old 01-01-2020, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1695814 View Post
Everything you said makes sense to me except could you explain what a "double-type number" is?


Thanks.
A "double" is basically a numeric type floating point decimal number that uses "double" the amount of storage that a "single" number would use.

It allows for the use of some very large numbers. It's often used when the size of the converted number would be questionable.
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  #47  
Old 01-01-2020, 08:00 PM
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This TechRepublic article may be helpful to understand Double vs Single etc data types.

Also bytes.com thread cautions on the Single data type (or rather on knowing what type is declared).
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  #48  
Old 01-02-2020, 09:48 AM
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Here are a couple of links that I have saved that are very technical and technical regarding floating point issues.

Comp sci discussion of fp issues

Double errors and VBA
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  #49  
Old 01-02-2020, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Grondin View Post
Here are a couple of links that I have saved that are very technical and technical regarding floating point issues.

Comp sci discussion of fp issues

Double errors and VBA
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  #50  
Old 01-03-2020, 05:01 PM
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My new company uses a lot of MS Access - and I will sometimes get an error when running a macro that's just a bunch of various stepwise queries that says something like

Error Code (-3034) Reserved Error

Google hasn't really been able to offer much helpful assistance. Usually I'll retry the macro and then it runs fine. But it's kind of annoying.

Does anyone have any ideas?
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