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  #1  
Old 08-08-2014, 06:54 PM
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Default To Commute or Not to Commute?

To Commute or Not to Commute? That is the question.


I'm from New Jersey, go to school in NYC, and recently finished up my summer internship at an NJ auto/home company. I started thinking about where I'd like to work after graduation and have reached a dilemma (as the title states).


Following graduation, I was thinking of waiting a year to move into the city (to save up a little bit before getting an apartment, not looking for roommates). From that idea, I could live in NJ and work in NJ for a very similar salary when compared to NY median pay for Actuary I. My only cost would be gas, but the commute time would be amazing.

If I commuted to NYC and lived in NJ, I would sacrifice about 2 additional hours per day to the God of Commuting & Traffic. I would also have the cost of a bus pass (which is around $300-$400/mo) and a lot of my free time would be eaten up. BUT having a job in NYC positions me better to move to the city and not worry about job searching again OR worry about leaving a job after a year.

Finally, if I lived in NYC and worked in NYC, without saving, it would cost me $24-$30k for apartment costs (modest studio). This is really the ideal situation, but not the ideal cost.


As you can tell, my dilemma is picking one of these three..and I can't decide if I want to be the Job Changer, The Commuter, or The New Yorker. Any insight on these three types? Does where you work initially have a greater affect on getting a better job (NJ to NYC)?
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Old 08-08-2014, 07:03 PM
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I live in NJ and work in NJ. I'm doing well.

"Does where you work initially have a greater affect on getting a better job (NJ to NYC)?" Location-wise, no
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Old 08-08-2014, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by zjbarden View Post
To Commute or Not to Commute? That is the question.


I'm from New Jersey, go to school in NYC, and recently finished up my summer internship at an NJ auto/home company. I started thinking about where I'd like to work after graduation and have reached a dilemma (as the title states).


Following graduation, I was thinking of waiting a year to move into the city (to save up a little bit before getting an apartment, not looking for roommates). From that idea, I could live in NJ and work in NJ for a very similar salary when compared to NY median pay for Actuary I. My only cost would be gas, but the commute time would be amazing.

If I commuted to NYC and lived in NJ, I would sacrifice about 2 additional hours per day to the God of Commuting & Traffic. I would also have the cost of a bus pass (which is around $300-$400/mo) and a lot of my free time would be eaten up. BUT having a job in NYC positions me better to move to the city and not worry about job searching again OR worry about leaving a job after a year.

Finally, if I lived in NYC and worked in NYC, without saving, it would cost me $24-$30k for apartment costs (modest studio). This is really the ideal situation, but not the ideal cost.


As you can tell, my dilemma is picking one of these three..and I can't decide if I want to be the Job Changer, The Commuter, or The New Yorker. Any insight on these three types? Does where you work initially have a greater affect on getting a better job (NJ to NYC)?
Dude commuting sucks. Live in the city and get a roommate if you have to. Go live with Dismal Science imo.
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Old 08-08-2014, 07:46 PM
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I live in NJ and work in NJ. I'm doing well.

"Does where you work initially have a greater affect on getting a better job (NJ to NYC)?" Location-wise, no
Thanks for the feedback. What area do you work in (life, health, pension, p&c?)


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Dude commuting sucks. Live in the city and get a roommate if you have to. Go live with Dismal Science imo.
I'm getting that vibe. I'm going to feel around for companies in NJ, try out a spring internship in NYC. Just want to be seasoned and attractive to employers.

As far as roommates, after college I don't want to worry about living with someone I don't know (so rooming with someone I do know is a possibility, but still). Sorry, picky. Haha.
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Old 08-08-2014, 07:53 PM
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If you're taking public transit, commute time = study time.

Win-win, imo.
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Old 08-08-2014, 08:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Malcolm View Post
If you're taking public transit, commute time = study time.

Win-win, imo.
True. I considered that. That's a lot of studying time too. Still up in the air.
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Unfortunately you've joined the AO, where enthusiasm for being an actuary goes to die.
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:39 PM
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I live pretty far out in Westchester now, and was able to get a whole lot of studying done on the train into the city.

I also managed to get studying done on the subway going from Queens to Manhattan, but that's a bit trickier than commuter trains.
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:59 PM
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I live pretty far out in Westchester now, and was able to get a whole lot of studying done on the train into the city.

I also managed to get studying done on the subway going from Queens to Manhattan, but that's a bit trickier than commuter trains.
Rush hour E train is hell. I've tried studying on there with no avail. But thanks for the feedback - I heard studying as a commuter was better.
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Originally Posted by CubsPhan View Post
Unfortunately you've joined the AO, where enthusiasm for being an actuary goes to die.
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"Those who fail to plan, plan to fail. Therefore, I must plan my work, and work my plan."
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:08 PM
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I managed to do the E train, because I mainly did flashcards there.
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Old 08-12-2014, 12:54 AM
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Commuting isn't so bad if you can get used to it. I personally have to travel all the way across NJ to Newark every day for university, and to Bridgewater every day for work (MetLife), so I've been in touch with the T&C God for many years. Depends on how much you can tolerate it; I live in the country because I wouldn't want to live in NYC or a more populated area, but obviously that causes friction with the likely job locations. The ideal situation would be to get to know/room with someone with similar employment who lives there, and get a feel for which lifestyle you prefer, before committing to one or the other option.

Some others mentioned that they get studying done on trains. I personally get most of my academic work done on trains, but I have never tried studying for exams on a train. For me personally, when I am actually preparing for an exam (as opposed to just studying to build knowledge), I don't like to study around people/commotion as I like to try to simulate actual exam circumstances. Again, it's all pretty much down to you and how you like to do business.
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