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  #21  
Old 08-14-2019, 06:50 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
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Originally Posted by Hello, My Baby View Post
Usually useless replies are at least attempts to be funny, but not this one.
Nope. Every word is sincere.
Dude wants to make money. I say, let him. You think that's a joke. I pity you.

Also, probably a troll-started thread. So, all replies are useless. Some are correct.
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  #22  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:07 PM
koudai8 koudai8 is offline
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Nope. Every word is sincere.
Dude wants to make money. I say, let him. You think that's a joke. I pity you.

Also, probably a troll-started thread. So, all replies are useless. Some are correct.
There is a difference between "I want to make money" and asking "why do actuaries make so little compare to other 'top jobs'" in tech, since actuaries used to be one of those before the financial crisis. Especially considering the efforts actuaries put into exams.

So far, replies have been generally very helpful.
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Last edited by koudai8; 08-14-2019 at 09:31 PM..
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  #23  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Nope. Every word is sincere.
Dude wants to make money. I say, let him. You think that's a joke. I pity you.

Also, probably a troll-started thread. So, all replies are useless. Some are correct.
Just because it's sincere doesn't mean it's not crap. You contributed absolutely nothing except "Go away". FWIW, I don't think this was a troll OP... It sounded like a legitimate question.
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Yes, well, that's partially the result of my robust education. I was exposed to far more than a narrow money-making selection of classes. The influence of art, literature, and other liberal arts makes it easier for me to write coherently in a format significantly longer than 140 characters. Additionally, I am able to use colorful terms that illustrate my ideas, words that exceed two syllables in length, and even proper punctuation (most of the time).
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  #24  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:34 PM
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I think tech has always cycled higher and lower than actuary, which is one of the most stable jobs possible, relative to economic cycles, or almost anything else really. Of course that doesn't mean it will always be true, but it's a good bet.
Will add to my previous reply: When Y2K was coming up , programmers were making a ton. Wasn't unusual to find young people bragging how amazing their jobs were - programmers with 2-3 years of experience making 50% more than an actuary they graduated with (and no studying). I suggested that after Y2K, they would see a lot of slack as companies took a breather from tech investment. Response was usually some version of "Yeah, eventually I'll have 50 recruiters chasing me instead of 100". Realty: The very best still had great jobs but a lot of people who had mediocre skills and the ability to negotiate that into something well-paying in 1997-99, did not have the programming skills and negotiation ability to leverage that into a great job, or any job, in 2001. Maybe that's what 2022 looks like, maybe not.



Would add that this
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Originally Posted by koudai8 View Post
deal with the most complex products where interaction of risks is very unique (biometric risks and financial risks) and that things can go wrong either way -- the classical short straddle problem -- where the insurer suffers if rates go up or down, and that we as actuaries get so little monetary recognition.
seems an odd way to think about the actuarial field, as the risk affects the employer, but there's no real direct risk for the actuary - rates go up, companies need actuaries; rates go down, companies need actuaries. The rest of the OP seems a little off to me as it appears to be focused on extreme cases rather than norms, but I don't know enough about the programming norms to say it's wrong.

Last edited by Westley; 08-14-2019 at 08:42 PM..
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  #25  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:42 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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Originally Posted by Hello, My Baby View Post
Usually useless replies are at least attempts to be funny, but not this one.
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Yeah what happened to the quant market, is it saturated now?
Consecutive posts lol
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  #26  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:45 PM
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Consecutive posts lol
But seriously, we don't hear about quants anymore, and they were a really hot commodity around 2007 or so. The economy has recovered, but still no talk of that market, only data science.
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Originally Posted by Helena Lake View Post
Yes, well, that's partially the result of my robust education. I was exposed to far more than a narrow money-making selection of classes. The influence of art, literature, and other liberal arts makes it easier for me to write coherently in a format significantly longer than 140 characters. Additionally, I am able to use colorful terms that illustrate my ideas, words that exceed two syllables in length, and even proper punctuation (most of the time).
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  #27  
Old 08-14-2019, 11:09 PM
hjacjswo hjacjswo is offline
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So is it pretty common to be making around 200k with 10 yrs and fellowship in nyc?
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  #28  
Old 08-15-2019, 08:25 AM
Locrian Locrian is offline
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But seriously, we don't hear about quants anymore, and they were a really hot commodity around 2007 or so. The economy has recovered, but still no talk of that market, only data science.
Financial regulation was a big (but certainly not only) part of this shift. Still plenty of people out there doing that though.
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  #29  
Old 08-15-2019, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Hello, My Baby View Post
Usually useless replies are at least attempts to be funny, but not this one.
That was a totally appropriate response.

We could discuss for days if programmers really make more than actuaries, but the OP seems to have their mind made up on that point.

We could discuss why programmers make more than actuaries, but the "why" may not be important. If the OP thinks programmers have it better, they should go be one.

We occasionally see threads here sating it's not "fair" that a certain career makes more than us without requiring exams. Those can lead to interesting discussions, but it rarely seems to satisfy those who posted.
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  #30  
Old 08-15-2019, 09:55 AM
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So is it pretty common to be making around 200k with 10 yrs and fellowship in nyc?
Is that all in or just base?
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