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  #21  
Old 11-18-2007, 08:46 PM
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Alto Reed on a Tenor Sax Alto Reed on a Tenor Sax is offline
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BTW, for some of you gringos not "in the know" on this, spelling in Spanish is a LOT different than it is in English. In English pronunciation it is almost cliche to say how the sound of letters varies wildly between words.

Spanish is completely different, in that, with very few exceptions, every word is spelled exactly how it sounds. The spelling of a word in Spanish provides an extremely unambiguous guide to the pronunciation of the word. There is no such thing as a homograph in Spanish, the same combination of letters will always be pronounced the same.

Now, certain individual letters will be pronounced differently according to their position in the word, but again, there are a very few very specific rules that govern these changes, and exceptions are practically nil. In English, the exceptions practically outnumber the rules themselves.

I only bring this up because some speakers of English may not see what the big deal is in discussing how one particular letter is pronounced, because in English, one letter has 20 different pronunciations, with no rule to tell you which is used when. Not so in Spanish, the rules are precise, and rigid.
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  #22  
Old 11-19-2007, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alto Reed on a Tenor Sax View Post
in English, one letter has 20 different pronunciations, with no rule to tell you which is used when. Not so in Spanish, the rules are precise, and rigid.
This is exactly what every Spanish teacher has taught me, and that's one reason why I loved learning Spanish.
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  #23  
Old 11-19-2007, 05:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alto Reed on a Tenor Sax View Post
BTW, for some of you gringos not "in the know" on this, spelling in Spanish is a LOT different than it is in English. In English pronunciation it is almost cliche to say how the sound of letters varies wildly between words.

Spanish is completely different, in that, with very few exceptions, every word is spelled exactly how it sounds. The spelling of a word in Spanish provides an extremely unambiguous guide to the pronunciation of the word. There is no such thing as a homograph in Spanish, the same combination of letters will always be pronounced the same.

Now, certain individual letters will be pronounced differently according to their position in the word, but again, there are a very few very specific rules that govern these changes, and exceptions are practically nil. In English, the exceptions practically outnumber the rules themselves.

I only bring this up because some speakers of English may not see what the big deal is in discussing how one particular letter is pronounced, because in English, one letter has 20 different pronunciations, with no rule to tell you which is used when. Not so in Spanish, the rules are precise, and rigid.
I think that this is beside the point, as most if not all who posted here realize that Spanish is phonetic. More relevant is the fact that, as with any other widely-spoken language, there are dialectical differences between groups of Spanish-speakers.
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  #24  
Old 11-19-2007, 10:25 PM
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I think that this is beside the point, as most if not all who posted here realize that Spanish is phonetic.
Hey, you never know. I was in my second year of college Spanish before a professor finally clued me into this. Maybe I am a little lento.
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  #25  
Old 11-27-2007, 05:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Alto Reed on a Tenor Sax View Post
Hey, you never know. I was in my second year of college Spanish before a professor finally clued me into this. Maybe I am a little lento.
You shouldn't have thlept through firtht year!
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  #26  
Old 08-05-2008, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by soyleche View Post
Unless you are in Spain it doesn't tend to matter much. In Spain (I believe) the "z" sounds like "th", s and c both sound like "ss"
Actually, the "soft c" has the sound of "z" and "z" is only used where a "c" would be hard; for example the plural of "feliz" is "felices"...
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  #27  
Old 12-06-2008, 11:41 AM
the acting drunktuary the acting drunktuary is offline
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Originally Posted by lewisje View Post
Actually, the "soft c" has the sound of "z" and "z" is only used where a "c" would be hard; for example the plural of "feliz" is "felices"...
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