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  #81  
Old 07-05-2010, 09:44 AM
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http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/C...ise.6385002.jp

Quote:
Cut retirement age, not raise it
....
But the Secretary of the North East Pensioners' Association, John Berry, of Sydney Gardens, South Shields, has slammed the proposal.

Mr Berry, 75, said today: "I think it will be a tragedy if they do that.

"The retirement age should come down, not up. Young people can't find work as it is.

"The Government is coming out with this kind of waffle because it doesn't know where to turn. There's no work in this area, so why raise the retirement age?

"I think promises should be kept about early retirement. This change will be detrimental to young people. This new coalition doesn't have the knowledge."
Don't think that one's on the table, buddy.
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  #82  
Old 07-05-2010, 12:00 PM
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Yes - That's we need. Teenagers getting retirement social security during the summer!
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  #83  
Old 07-07-2010, 06:11 AM
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http://www.businessweek.com/ap/finan.../D9GPLQQO0.htm

Quote:
The European Union's executive says Europeans should not retire before 70 to save cash-strapped state pension funds.

In a paper to be published Wednesday, the European Commission says four workers' contributions to state pensions currently help support two retirees.

The growing number of older people would require the average retirement age to rise to 67 in 2040 and 70 by 2060 to maintain the current pension system, it says.


Lower birth rates and longer life expectancy mean that retiring earlier will not be sustainable.

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  #84  
Old 07-09-2010, 10:52 AM
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http://blogs.ft.com/brusselsblog/201...nt-the-answer/
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Take a Green Paper published today by the European Commission. A Green Paper is a document designed to stimulate public discussion, not make firm policy proposals, so the Commission steers a cautious path through the issues. Nonetheless, it observes in one passage: “A number of member-states have demonstrated that a promising policy option for strengthening the sustainability of pension systems is an automatic adjustment that increases the pensionable age in line with future gains in life expectancy.”

In other words, it would be a matter of unchangeable public policy: politicians couldn’t touch it once it was introduced. Such a step would have profound implications. As the Green Paper notes, life expectancy in the EU has risen by about five years over the past 50 years, and it may rise by another seven years by 2060. On these trends, people’s retirement age could be pushed somewhere near 70 if an automatic adjustment mechanism were in place, and they wouldn’t be able to do anything about it.
....

Would they, really? And would automatic increases in the retirement age be forever excluded from political debate? It defies common sense to believe that political parties, employers, trade unions and interest groups of all kinds - not least, pensioners themselves - would maintain eternal silence on the subject.

In the end, there is no substitute for solutions reached through free political discussion and, at times, conflict. The solutions will probably be temporary, and more efforts required. But that is the price for living in an open society. You cannot depoliticise everything.
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  #85  
Old 07-10-2010, 08:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigmeister General View Post
"The end of retirement at 60 is the end of a world," Left Party leader Jean-Luc Melenchon said on France Info radio. "Today is a day of sadness and anger."

-
When do most people retire in the US?

According to wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retirement

80% of people are not working during ages 65-70
57% ages 60-65
34% ages 55-60

We (USA) have the most people working later in life (of those countries sampled)

Last edited by ParkPlaceActuary; 07-11-2010 at 10:00 AM..
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  #86  
Old 07-10-2010, 11:11 PM
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Since when is "retirement" a right? I can't find it inside the Constitution. Get back to work you lazy bums
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  #87  
Old 07-11-2010, 06:41 PM
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On the "right to retirement":
http://powip.com/2010/05/the-right-to-retirement/
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  #88  
Old 07-17-2010, 11:13 AM
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Europe in general
http://www.businessweek.com/investor...714_719959.htm
Quote:
Politicians from Athens to Madrid have targeted pension reform as a way to offset government debt. No wonder. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development, state pensions in Europe can reach 95 percent of preretirement earnings, vs. 39 percent in the U.S. from Social Security payouts (though many Americans can tap into private 401(k)s and similar tax-deferred options available to few Europeans). Retirement ages are often lower than in the U.S.: Greeks who have worked 35 years can get a full pension at 58 despite an official retirement age of 65. Says David Blake, director of the Pension Institute at Cass Business School in London: "Europe is in a fantasy world" when it comes to retirement.

With nearly everyone in Europe eligible for a public pension, governments know they need to get people to spend more years on the job. Currently, there are four workers for every retiree in Europe. That ratio will halve by mid-century as the population ages, the OECD says. The change risks leaving Europe without enough tax revenue to pay for lush pensions. "Working longer is the only solution for avoiding old-age poverty," says Monika Queisser, head of the OECD's social policy division.
....
With Europe's unemployment rate at 9.6 percent and rising, keeping older people on the job longer will make it harder for the young to get hired. And some employees already give up their work due to medical or personal reasons well before public pensions kick in. That means governments may need to pick up health-care costs and even some welfare benefits, so the savings from later retirement could be less than expected. "Many people stop working because they've just had enough," says Krzysztof Hagemejer, coordinator of social security policy at the International Labor Organization in Geneva. "Raising the retirement age won't solve that problem."

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  #89  
Old 07-25-2010, 01:42 PM
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UK
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...=feeds-newsxml
Quote:
More workers will have to wait until they are 68 to claim their state pension as the Government speeds up plans to raise the retirement age.

In an interview with the Daily Mail today, Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith says the move will save billions of pounds.

Labour set out plans to increase the retirement age to 66 by 2024 and 68 by 2046 to reflect growing life expectancy.

Before the election, the Tories suggested that it should rise to 66 sooner - by 2016.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz0ugXVrAWc
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  #90  
Old 07-29-2010, 07:28 AM
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France
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-0...erth-says.html

Quote:
French President Nicolas Sarkozy won’t accept changes to his plan to raise the retirement age or balance the pension system’s accounts by 2018, Labor Minister Eric Woerth said as parliament starts debate on the measure.
....
The bill would increase the retirement age to 62 from 60, while maintaining retirement at 60 for people who started work particularly young, or whose strenuous jobs can’t be carried out by people in their 60s. The bill calls for such cases to be determined on an individual basis, while unions want whole categories of jobs to be eligible for early retirement.

The opposition Socialist Party will propose 150 amendments, Marisol Touraine, a Socialist lawmaker, said in an interview with Les Echos. The opposition wants to keep the retirement age at 60 and plug gaps in the system’s accounts through new taxes.
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