Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Property - Casualty / General Insurance
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-12-2019, 10:19 AM
jerrytuttle jerrytuttle is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 304
Default Readability of insurance policies

Hi,

I have known for a long time that Florida has a readability statute, 627.4145, requiring a minimum Flesch Test score for every policy. The Flesch test is a formula whose arguments are word count, sentence count, and syllable count. I always wondered, especially in ancient times (the 80's) whether someone manually counted these things. Would you know how your company handles this - do you have internal software for this, or do you contract this task out?

I believe prior to the 80's, there was a 1943 NY standard fire insurance policy that was part of most property policies, that was infamous for having a really long sentence.

I am currently studying text analysis, a subset of data analysis, which has been used among other things to suggest which Beatles songs were primarily written by John and which by Paul. I think I can write some code to perform this Flesch test. Is there a place online where I can find a sample policy, hopefully as a PDF file?

Thanks,
Jerry Tuttle
__________________
Thanks,
Jerry
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-12-2019, 10:29 AM
Arthur Itas's Avatar
Arthur Itas Arthur Itas is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Atlanta
Studying for Prostate exam
College: Hard Knocks
Posts: 23,055
Default

I had to do some FL form filing work in the 90s. The old Lotus suite word processor AmiPro had a built in Flesch test algorithm that we used. Looks like there are some free online ones now but I've never used them.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-12-2019, 03:32 PM
therealsylvos's Avatar
therealsylvos therealsylvos is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 17,805
Default

Googling turns up this:

https://www.insurance.wa.gov/sites/d...nce-policy.pdf
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by ao fan View Post
i like laying in the tube and pretending that i'm dead.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-12-2019, 03:35 PM
redearedslider's Avatar
redearedslider redearedslider is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 14,130
Default

If you want boilerplate policies I'd look to ISO. A few minutes of googling turned up this: http://www.tmsic.com/pdfs/Commercial...renceBasis.pdf
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abraham Weishaus View Post
ASM does not have a discussion of stimulation, but considering how boring the manual is, maybe it would be a good idea.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-12-2019, 06:29 PM
Maphisto's Sidekick's Avatar
Maphisto's Sidekick Maphisto's Sidekick is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: South Park Genetics Lab
College: Ardnox
Favorite beer: The kind with alcohol
Posts: 3,509
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrytuttle View Post
I have known for a long time that Florida has a readability statute, 627.4145, requiring a minimum Flesch Test score for every policy. The Flesch test is a formula whose arguments are word count, sentence count, and syllable count. I always wondered, especially in ancient times (the 80's) whether someone manually counted these things. Would you know how your company handles this - do you have internal software for this, or do you contract this task out?
Back when I was doing product work, I used the Flesch test built into Word, after making the following modifications to the source text:
  • Remove all paragraph/clause numbering (the A./B./C./1./2./3.'s)
  • Remove all section titles and subtitles, headers, footers
  • Remove all auto-hyphenation
  • Remove all tables, and the table of contents
  • Replace semicolons and colons with periods

...in order to get the calculation to comply with 627.4145(5).

I confirmed that by scoring a couple of endorsements by hand, to confirm the match. (Tedious work, but at the time I didn't have anyone else I trusted to do the work correctly.)

The statute also hints at a couple of strategies that can be used to get a problematic endorsement to pass the test.

And as to getting policy forms to play with: You probably have access to your homeowners and auto policies through your personal carrier's customer service website. In many states where filings are public record (e.g. Florida), most non-bureau forms are available through the same mechanism that you can pull rate filings. ISO forms are usually available through ISOnet, if you have a subscription.

Last edited by Maphisto's Sidekick; 08-12-2019 at 06:33 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-15-2019, 06:39 PM
jerrytuttle jerrytuttle is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 304
Default My auto policy has long sentences

Maphisto, thanks for your suggestions. I am trying to learn R, so this is an R project.

I used all your suggestions except removing semicolons. It seems to me a semicolon does not end a sentence. This is probably why my policy has some really long sentences, and a really long average sentence, and my policy failed the Florida requirement.

By the way, one of the standard tokenizing is to remove capital letters, so that word frequency can be calculated without counting a capitalized word and its uncapitalized equivalent as two different words. Having done so, I found the sentence tokenizing failed to recognize sentences that did not begin with capital letters, so I put the capitalization back for sentence tokenizing.
__________________
Thanks,
Jerry
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-16-2019, 09:06 AM
Vorian Atreides's Avatar
Vorian Atreides Vorian Atreides is offline
Wiki/Note Contributor
CAS
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: As far as 3 cups of sugar will take you
Studying for CSPA
College: Hard Knocks
Favorite beer: Most German dark lagers
Posts: 68,552
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrytuttle View Post
Maphisto, thanks for your suggestions. I am trying to learn R, so this is an R project.

I used all your suggestions except removing semicolons. It seems to me a semicolon does not end a sentence. This is probably why my policy has some really long sentences, and a really long average sentence, and my policy failed the Florida requirement.

By the way, one of the standard tokenizing is to remove capital letters, so that word frequency can be calculated without counting a capitalized word and its uncapitalized equivalent as two different words. Having done so, I found the sentence tokenizing failed to recognize sentences that did not begin with capital letters, so I put the capitalization back for sentence tokenizing.
I wonder if you use ALL CAPS (I'm sure that has to be a text function to convert all letters to capital letters) would allow you to get word frequency and sentence count w/o two separate token streams.
__________________
I find your lack of faith disturbing

Why should I worry about dying? Itís not going to happen in my lifetime!


Freedom of speech is not a license to discourtesy

#BLACKMATTERLIVES
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-16-2019, 11:46 AM
Maphisto's Sidekick's Avatar
Maphisto's Sidekick Maphisto's Sidekick is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: South Park Genetics Lab
College: Ardnox
Favorite beer: The kind with alcohol
Posts: 3,509
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrytuttle View Post
Maphisto, thanks for your suggestions. I am trying to learn R, so this is an R project.

I used all your suggestions except removing semicolons. It seems to me a semicolon does not end a sentence. This is probably why my policy has some really long sentences, and a really long average sentence, and my policy failed the Florida requirement.
Grammatically, a semicolon doesn't end a sentence. However, when evaluating a document for readability, we don't care so much about sentences, as we do separation between thoughts.

So, perhaps we have a list containing:
  1. One thought;
  2. Another thought; and
  3. One final thought.

In that case, the semicolons serve as natural break points to help make the document somewhat less incomprehensible.

I think the argument could be made that semicolons as list separators could merit different treatment than semicolons in long sentences; but I think even then we still have a separation of thoughts occurring.

Besides, what matters for approval is the methodology prescribed by statute, rather than standard rules of grammar.

(That statement, however, doesn't apply in Louisiana, where the last times I made rate/rule filings, someone on DOI staff rejected the filing due to a product manager's slightly sloppy grammar.)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.20542 seconds with 9 queries