Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Careers - Employment
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Upload your resume securely at https://www.dwsimpson.com
to be contacted when our jobs meet your skills and objectives.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #31  
Old 01-26-2013, 09:36 PM
Crystal Math Addict Crystal Math Addict is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Margaritaville
Studying for GH Advanced
Posts: 697
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie Howe View Post
No idea, but I am guessing it is something along the lines of Aspergers. Maybe a very mild Aspergers, otherwise known as being a geek?
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 01-26-2013, 09:37 PM
Devastator's Avatar
Devastator Devastator is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 19,716
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Smoothie View Post
How is that any different from office work? The doyens send you emails detailing what they want, and then you give it to them, except you're sitting in a cube instead of at home.
No benefits. You're an independent consultant at that point
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 01-26-2013, 09:44 PM
Devastator's Avatar
Devastator Devastator is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 19,716
Default

I always view interviews like it his... Your resume is obviously good enough. Otherwise they would not have brought you in. You need to accomplish the following:

1) prove to the interviewer(s) that people in the office will like you. It sounds silly, but a good personality matters. Ive done plenty of interviews. If someone comes across as cocky or boring, they may decide the person is not a good fit for the office.

2) this kind of goes with the first, but communicate effectively. FSA's, etc are expected to manage people down the road. So take your prior work experiences and be able to talk about them confidently and also find a way to explain how your skills would fit the position.

3) show them that you've prepared for the interview by asking good questions. For example, if you are interviewing for a health job, know a little bit about healthcare reform or be able to ask a good question or 2 about it.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-26-2013, 09:52 PM
algebrat's Avatar
algebrat algebrat is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ork
Studying for GED
Favorite beer: Scieoclean
Posts: 2,143
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by water View Post
What is Linear Processing Disorder?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie Howe View Post
No idea, but I am guessing it is something along the lines of Aspergers. Maybe a very mild Aspergers, otherwise known as being a geek?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crystal Math Addict View Post
Yeah, I took a look at what would happen if people tried to google that. It doesn't really come up, I was diagnosed with that when I was like five years old, and I don't think it's in the DSM classification system now.

Closest I could come, was googling linear processing http://capone.mtsu.edu/studskl/hd/LRBrain.html#Linear

So I (was said to) have a deficiency in linear processing. Which is funny because it's associated with the right brain, where as math is said on same page to be associated with the left brain.

I get kind of ticked when the words autism or aspergers come whizzing by my ear. Unless it's an intelligent psychologist, you can miss me with all that. No offense, just my honest feelings.

In the link, it suggests that I am a more big picture thinker. A lot of it rings true, since I was pretty disciplined in understanding the material well before the lecture. And I do tend to study with a sort of top-down approach. I like to embed the details in a larger framework. Sort of a zoom-in zoom-out thing going on.
__________________
P FM MFE
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-27-2013, 12:29 AM
Annie Howe's Avatar
Annie Howe Annie Howe is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,168
Default

Hmmm. I thought everyone was like that. I mean it is hard to learn stuff unless everything is connected to a big picture.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-27-2013, 12:36 AM
Annie Howe's Avatar
Annie Howe Annie Howe is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,168
Default

Sorry about guessing aspergers. It's just that you meet so many people who have a little bit of aspergers

I don't think it is necessarily associated with autism by the way, although it can be.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 01-27-2013, 01:29 AM
algebrat's Avatar
algebrat algebrat is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ork
Studying for GED
Favorite beer: Scieoclean
Posts: 2,143
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie Howe View Post
Sorry about guessing aspergers. It's just that you meet so many people who have a little bit of aspergers

I don't think it is necessarily associated with autism by the way, although it can be.
Who knows, you might be right. Or at least based on the above, I feel like it reminds me of how often a miscommunication seems to hit a resonant frequency and I get bridge collapse. Sorry if I let out a testy sounding comment, I think I really meant to just point out that you may encounter *some* people may find it politically incorrect to have that sort of label thrown around.

Although I do the same thing. I've gotten maybe a little too comfortable with using "OCD" as an adjective. Like, if someone keeps things organized, it's OCD. That could potentially offend people. It's sort of become a household term, more so than ADD, because I use OCD even if someone does just one thing organized, and the rest not.
__________________
P FM MFE
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-27-2013, 01:54 AM
algebrat's Avatar
algebrat algebrat is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ork
Studying for GED
Favorite beer: Scieoclean
Posts: 2,143
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie Howe View Post
Hmmm. I thought everyone was like that. I mean it is hard to learn stuff unless everything is connected to a big picture.
I can't think of a good example. So I wonder if I'm wrong.

What are your own thoughts on different types of thinkers. Is it simply 0 to 10 1-d stupid to smart? I don't mean to put you on the spot, just fishing for if you have some other ways to differentiate thinking types. Not that you need to argue against the holistic versus details thing.

But I've seen a post not too long ago where someone remarked on how some people get through parts of algebra with a lot memorizing, as opposed to others who have a more conceptual understanding. Is this framing it wrong?

How about this. I feel I have a smaller buffer than some people. I cannot spin my rolodex of facts as aptly as some, so I rely more on zooming out to see the ideas in a problem from a big picture. So in that sense, I rely less on memorizing details, and require a more robust map. So I play with things, which can be fun, until I have the positive feedback of that feeling of a deeper understanding.

For an anecdote, I had a classmate in modern algebra, we did quite a bit of correspondence discussing the homework. And I had a reputation fro trying to make a picture for everything, and really having a visual understanding of complicated concepts from many of our classes, so some said I had a lot of geometric intuition. But in the algebra course, and in other analysis courses, he would just seem to fall on the right relation. So I joked that he had algebraic intuition. But really I call these geometric versus symbolic thinking. Sort of how in general in math, you try to use an optimal amount of geometry and algebra to get your answer.

I'm incredibly jealous of people with symbolic reasoning. Here's another place where I see it coming to play. Say two people hear something. You might prefer the person who gets the big picture to recall what was said. But the big picture is more of minimalistic painting of the situation. Or a framework, or model of the situation. The guy (or gal) who remembers the big picture, is entirely susceptible to remembering the big picture incorrectly.

What I mean is that the big picture guy will interpret what was said, and remember that. So remember what I said, not what you thought I meant. The algebraic intuition fellow, simply remembers exactly what was said.

I can't remember what someone said, so I usually just remember conceptually what I thought they said. It's bad news.


And you see, the way I just ramble on, it's my type of person that exactly needs to focus on the big picture, to keep their thoughts organized. The more disorganized the brain, the more organized you have to be.

So... does that answer your question?
__________________
P FM MFE
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-27-2013, 01:56 AM
Annie Howe's Avatar
Annie Howe Annie Howe is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,168
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by algebrat View Post
Who knows, you might be right. Or at least based on the above, I feel like it reminds me of how often a miscommunication seems to hit a resonant frequency and I get bridge collapse. Sorry if I let out a testy sounding comment, I think I really meant to just point out that you may encounter *some* people may find it politically incorrect to have that sort of label thrown around.

Although I do the same thing. I've gotten maybe a little too comfortable with using "OCD" as an adjective. Like, if someone keeps things organized, it's OCD. That could potentially offend people. It's sort of become a household term, more so than ADD, because I use OCD even if someone does just one thing organized, and the rest not.
Yeah, I just was not thinking. I sometimes think if *I* would not be offended at something, others will not be either, which is not true, obviously.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-27-2013, 02:23 AM
Annie Howe's Avatar
Annie Howe Annie Howe is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,168
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by algebrat View Post
I can't think of a good example. So I wonder if I'm wrong.

What are your own thoughts on different types of thinkers. Is it simply 0 to 10 1-d stupid to smart? I don't mean to put you on the spot, just fishing for if you have some other ways to differentiate thinking types. Not that you need to argue against the holistic versus details thing.

But I've seen a post not too long ago where someone remarked on how some people get through parts of algebra with a lot memorizing, as opposed to others who have a more conceptual understanding. Is this framing it wrong?

How about this. I feel I have a smaller buffer than some people. I cannot spin my rolodex of facts as aptly as some, so I rely more on zooming out to see the ideas in a problem from a big picture. So in that sense, I rely less on memorizing details, and require a more robust map. So I play with things, which can be fun, until I have the positive feedback of that feeling of a deeper understanding.

For an anecdote, I had a classmate in modern algebra, we did quite a bit of correspondence discussing the homework. And I had a reputation fro trying to make a picture for everything, and really having a visual understanding of complicated concepts from many of our classes, so some said I had a lot of geometric intuition. But in the algebra course, and in other analysis courses, he would just seem to fall on the right relation. So I joked that he had algebraic intuition. But really I call these geometric versus symbolic thinking. Sort of how in general in math, you try to use an optimal amount of geometry and algebra to get your answer.

I'm incredibly jealous of people with symbolic reasoning. Here's another place where I see it coming to play. Say two people hear something. You might prefer the person who gets the big picture to recall what was said. But the big picture is more of minimalistic painting of the situation. Or a framework, or model of the situation. The guy (or gal) who remembers the big picture, is entirely susceptible to remembering the big picture incorrectly.

What I mean is that the big picture guy will interpret what was said, and remember that. So remember what I said, not what you thought I meant. The algebraic intuition fellow, simply remembers exactly what was said.

I can't remember what someone said, so I usually just remember conceptually what I thought they said. It's bad news.


And you see, the way I just ramble on, it's my type of person that exactly needs to focus on the big picture, to keep their thoughts organized. The more disorganized the brain, the more organized you have to be.

So... does that answer your question?
Hmmm... I buy into Briggs Meyers personality types, to a large extent. It is obviously not the be all and end all of how people think, but it helps me make sense of it a little bit.

Maybe the N versus S is relevant. N's are more abstract thinkers. A lot of the math people tend to be N's. S's are concrete thinkers. They rely on examples. specific cases etc. more. This makes me think S's would be more likely to try to learn specific cases first, rather than think about the general concept.

I am an N, and have trouble talking to S's sometimes. My father is an S. When I talk to him, it feels like he is randomly pointing out facts around a certain topic, without an overall point. I adopted a strategy where if he does that, I let go of whatever I was asking about, and say something random but related. He seems to be happy with that. I met some artist types which are similar, the same strategy worked with them too. I am not sure if all S's are like that or not, probably not. Still, at least some S's seem to like to chat without needing an overarching point.

With geometry versus analysis, I am not sure. I am quite good with geometry and drawing. Some other, brilliant people who are excellent in analysis and string theory, are not. I was surprised, but I never even thought we had a different way of thinking because of this.

Some people have exceptional memory, like photographic memory, others can recall something they heard, like an audio recording. I have some of this audio recording thing, but it's not very good. Just enough to play annoying music in my head over and over again. I will remember random conversations verbatim. Otherwise than that, I am like you. I will remember whatever the overall meaning or pattern I thought was there, and I will remember everything else in relation to that. Come to think of it, I did have more trouble learning history than some others I know. I guess that is because I can't see the pattern before learning all the little facts. I do have a good memory though. I score very high on memory games and all.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.26345 seconds with 9 queries